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Journal of Supply Chain Management

Article Index - Results


A valuable reference tool, the Article Index is a comprehensive list of articles that have appeared in the Journal of Supply Chain Management (formerly International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management, Journal of Purchasing & Materials Management and Journal of Purchasing). Articles are organized by subject for easy locating and study.

Journal Article Index
Term selected: Organization and Procedure

  • A Buyer's Bases of Power, Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 1982), p. 8.

    This article is not available online.
  • "A Configuration Typology for Involving Purchasing Specialists in Product Development" Members Only Content, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Fall 2001), p. 11.

    This article develops a configuration typology for purchasing's involvement in product development projects. Six configurations are identified and analyzed, varying in degree of coordination and level of purchaser integration. The configurations are illustrated by five case studies performed in different companies operating in different industries. Enabling factors, such as the purchasing organization and the competencies and skills of the purchasers, can facilitate the involvement of purchasers in a development project. Project size and project complexity can be identified as driving factors influencing the appropriateness of the purchaser involvement configurations. Dedicated, full-time purchasing specialists in combination with a purchasing coordinator provide the strongest degree of involvement necessary for managing large and complex projects, whereas indirect, ad hoc purchasing involvement provides the lowest degree of involvement sufficient for small and relatively simple projects.
  • A Hierarchy of Purchasing Competencies, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring 1984), p. 8.

    This article is not available online.
  • A Macro Contingency Approach to the Study of Purchasing Behavior, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1986), p. 21.

    This article is not available online.
  • A Management Audit for Purchasing, Vol. 4, No. 1 (Winter 1968), p. 60.

    This article is not available online.
  • A Measure of the Occupational Status of Purchasing Agents, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1967), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • A Note on Competitive Bidding, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1967), p. 69.

    This article is not available online.
  • A Study of the Perceived Need Satisfaction of Purchasing Managers, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Spring 1972), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Allocation of Buyers' Time to Functional Activities, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 33.

    This article is not available online.
  • "An Empirical Investigation of Outsourcing Decisions" Members Only Content, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Winter 1999), p. 33.

    Eighty-five make or buy decisions, each made in a different enterprise, were classified into three categories (items/services made, items/services bought, new items/services) according to the method of acquisition before the resolution of the make or buy issue. Information was collected on a number of variables and analyzed by statistical methods. Items/services made (subjected to make or buy investigations) are characterized by low product complexity and low commercial uncertainty. On the contrary, items/services bought and new items/services (subjected to make or buy investigations) are characterized by high product complexity and high commercial uncertainty. The involvement of functions and hierarchical levels in make or buy investigations for new items/services was found to be relatively low. This fact increases the risk of making erroneous decisions that have a serious impact on the competitive position and profitability of enterprises.
  • Are Industrial Salespeople Buyer Oriented?, Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 1981), p. 12.

    This article is not available online.
  • Are Purchasing Managers Machiavellian?, Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 1982), p. 15.

    This article is not available online.
  • Attitudes of Salesmen Toward Industrial Buyers and Purchasing Policies, Vol. 6, No. 3 (Summer 1970), p. 28.

    This article is not available online.
  • Auditing the Purchasing Department, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Spring 1973), p. 45.

    This article is not available online.
  • Closing the Planning-Operations Gap, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter 1977), p. 3.

    This article is not available online.
  • Communication and Industrial Purchasing Behavior, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Spring 1970), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Cooperative Buyer/Seller Relationships and a Firm's Competitive Posture, Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 1989), p. 9.

    This article is not available online.
  • Critical Factors in Judging Buyer Effectiveness, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1975), p. 41.

    This article is not available online.
  • Dynamics of the Purchase Interview, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1974), p. 55.

    This article is not available online.
  • Emotional Motives in the Purchase of Industrial Goods: Historically Considered, Vol. 6, No. 3 (Summer 1970), p. 48.

    This article is not available online.
  • Equipment Replacement Models: User Evaluation, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 48.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Evolving Roles and Responsibilities of Purchasing Organizations" Members Only Content, Vol. 34, No. 1 (Winter 1998), p. 2.

    The Center for Advanced Purchasing Studies (CAPS) undertook its first focus study investigating organizational relationships in purchasing in 1987. This research was replicated in 1995. A total of 119 firms responded to both studies, providing a unique opportunity to perform a longitudinal analysis on patterns of change within the supply function. Analysis of these 119 firms demonstrated a high level of organizational churning in the areas of organization structure, chief purchasing officer (CPO) reporting relationship, CPO title, and CPO turnover. Findings also indicate that a high percentage of CPOs do not have prior purchasing experience and that organizational change has a negative influence on purchasing's involvement in major corporate activities.
  • "Gaining and Losing Pieces of the Supply Chain" Members Only Content, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Winter 2003), p. 27.

    This research focused on changes in supply chain responsibilities. The primary research question was: What are the reasons (drivers) for major changes in supply chain responsibilities? Over 200 such changes, comprising 158 additions and 44 deletions, were documented in the research. The findings are based on 10 case studies in large multi-business unit companies, seven headquartered in the United States and three in Europe, representing a variety of industries. Findings indicated three drivers of change for supply chain responsibilities. The chief purchasing officer and his or her staff members had a great deal of influence, particularly in additions to category 1 (acquisition of specific organizational needs) and category 2 (activities within the total supply chain).
  • How Multidimensional Is the Purchasing Job?, Vol. 26, No. 4 (Fall 1990), p. 27.

    This article is not available online.
  • How Purchasing Managers View Leadership, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Winter 1971), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Human Relations in Purchasing, Vol. 2, No. 4 (Fall 1966), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Impact of Technological Change on Operational Support Functions, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Summer 1969), p. 41.

    This article is not available online.
  • Industrial Buying as Organizational Behavior: A Guideline for Research Strategy, Vol. 8, No. 3 (Summer 1972), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Industrial Buying Behavior and the Motor Carrier Selection Decision, Vol. 8, No. 1 (Winter 1972), p. 18.

    This article is not available online.
  • Market Segmentation for Better Purchasing Results, Vol. 5, No. 4 (Fall 1969), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Measuring Uncertainty in High-Cost, High-Risk Procurements, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 59.

    This article is not available online.
  • Multiple-Phase Purchasing-Production Scheduling, Vol. 11, No. 4 (Winter 1975), p. 15.

    This article is not available online.
  • Occupational Stress among Purchasing Managers, Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 1982), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • OEM New Product Development Practices: The Case of the Automotive Industry, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer 2006).

    In industries where value added by suppliers contributes significantly to the final product, the competitiveness of the value chain depends upon supplier performance (cost, quality and on-time delivery). Despite the importance of supplier performance in new product development (NPD), most research has focused on supplier performance in operations. Few studies have focused on how product development practices of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) influence OEM evaluations of supplier performance. This paper posits a model of the relationships among three factions: OEM practices that involve suppliers in design, concurrent engineering practices of the OEM and OEM assessments of supplier performance. This model is tested and crossvalidated using a sample of 406 NPD projects in Germany and the United States. The findings suggest that NPD practices of OEMs influence their perceptions of suppliers’ performance.
  • Optimizing Aggregate Procurement Allocation Decisions, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 23.

    This article is not available online.
  • Organizational Level of the Purchasing Function, Vol. 20, No. 2 (Summer 1984), p. 14.

    This article is not available online.
  • Organizational Relationships in Purchasing, Vol. 24, No. 4 (Winter 1988), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Organizational Theory and Materials Management, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Summer 1969), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Pay-off to R & D Subcontractors from Military/Space Work, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 17.

    This article is not available online.
  • Perceptual Differences and Similarities of Vendor Attributes Between Purchasing and Non-Purchasing Executives, Vol. 10, No. 3 (Summer 1974), p. 16.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Agents: Seekers of Status — Personal and Professional, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1966), p. 17.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing and Profit: Contributions Worth Measuring, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Fall 1987), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Effectiveness, Vol. 14, No. 2 (Summer 1978), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing for Profits, Vol. 11, No. 2 (Summer 1975), p. 29.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Management Practices of Small Manufacturers, Vol. 24, No. 4 (Winter 1988), p. 26.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Purchasing's Role in Product Development: The Case for Time-Based Strategies" Members Only Content, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter 1994), p. 3.

    Aggressive global and domestic competition, accelerated technological advances, and market demands are catalysts in the thrusts to reduce product-to-market elapsed times. These developments have created the need for competitive firms to consider time-based strategies as a potential solution to the shorter time-to-market requirements of today's customers. The authors suggest that purchasing can play a more active role in the new product development process through its participation in a cooperative multi-disciplinary team approach. A team structure with the capabilities to reduce the new product development cycle is presented. In addition, the article introduces an organizational structure that facilitates purchasing's contribution to the success of time-based product development strategies.
  • Role Clarity and Job Satisfaction in Purchasing, Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 1981), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Role Conception and Purchasing Behavior, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Winter 1971), p. 57.

    This article is not available online.
  • Role Theory and Behavioral Style, Vol. 3, No. 4 (Fall 1967), p. 27.

    This article is not available online.
  • Salespeople View Buyer Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 3 (Fall 1982), p. 6.

    This article is not available online.
  • Situational Variables and Industrial Buying, Vol. 19, No. 4 (Winter 1983), p. 21.

    This article is not available online.
  • Subcontracting and Management of the 1970's, Vol. 4, No. 4 (Fall 1968), p. 13.

    This article is not available online.
  • Subcontracting Based on Integrated Standards: The Japanese Approach, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 17.

    This article is not available online.
  • Subcontractor Selection Systems in the Aerospace Industry, Vol. 3, No. 4 (Fall 1967), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Supply’s Growing Status and Influence: A Sixteen-Year Perspective, Vol. 42, No. 2 (Spring 2006), p. 33.

    The recent completion of a major survey of large North American supply organizations in 2003 permits a longitudinal perspective on supply roles and responsibilities over a 16-year period. The latest survey complements two earlier studies in 1987 and 1995. All three surveys counted at least 280 responding large North American supply organizations, thereby providing a valuable opportunity to examine trends and changes over time. Major areas of investigation for respondents in both the manufacturing and services sectors include supply organizational structure, supply chain responsibilities, and chief purchasing officer (CPO) reporting line, title and background. This research provides solid evidence that in both manufacturing and services, today’s CPOs have greater responsibilities, report higher in the organization and carry more significant titles than their predecessors. The conclusion is that, at least in large North American companies, supply has grown substantially in corporate status and influence since 1987, a particularly welcome discovery.
  • Taming the File Maintenance Monster: A Case Study, Vol. 23, No. 2 (Summer 1987), p. 21.

    This article is not available online.
  • Testing the 'Buygrid' Buying Process Model, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Winter 1986), p. 30.

    This article is not available online.
  • The 'Industrial' Revolution and Models of Buyer Behavior, Vol. 5, No. 4 (Fall 1969), p. 77.

    This article is not available online.
  • The 'Theory of Constraints' and the Make-or-Buy Decision, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Summer 1991), p. 38.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Art of Lumber Purchasing, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Winter 1969), p. 56.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Attitude of the Purchasing Agent Toward Reciprocity, Vol. 3, No. 3 (Summer 1967), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Buyer as Marketing Practitioner, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Fall 1976), p. 19.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Conflict-Performance Assumption, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 57.

    This article is not available online.
  • "The Development of a Time-Based Construct and Its Impact on Departmental Design and Structure" Members Only Content, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Fall 1997), p. 26.

    Cycle time reduction is a key element of logistics strategy, in which purchasing can play a pivotal role. Time-related mistakes made by purchasing and materials managers cause dysfunctional ripples throughout the remainder of the supply chain. This article develops a reliable and valid scale to measure purchasing's involvement in time-based strategies and tactics, and examines how the adoption of these activities impacts departmental design and structure.
  • The Effect of Bidding Procedures on Profits and Sales in the Contract Construction Industry, Vol. 4, No. 3 (Summer 1968), p. 42.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Effects of Professionalism on Purchasing Managers, Vol. 15, No. 1 (Spring 1979), p. 25.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Implications of Blanket Contracting for Industrial Purchasing and Marketing, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 51.

    This article is not available online.
  • "The Influence of Organizational Factors on Purchasing Activities" Members Only Content, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Summer 1998), p. 10.

    Data from the 1995 CAPS study on purchasing's organizational roles and responsibilities were used to examine the involvement of the supply area in major corporate activities, use of team-based purchasing techniques, and functions that report to purchasing. A number of organizational factors were found to influence the role of purchasing within the firm, including status and related work experience of the chief purchasing officer (CPO), and the degree to which the supply area was centralized. Overall, respondents indicated that purchasing had a low level of involvement in major corporate activities, despite previous research that demonstrated the value of the supply function as a competitive weapon. The study also found that a surprisingly large number of firms appointed individuals lacking prior purchasing experience to the position of CPO.
  • "The Long-Term Strategic Impact of Purchasing Partnerships" Members Only Content, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Fall 1994), p. 13.

    It is generally believed that a long-term commitment is needed to maximize the benefits associated with purchasing partnerships. However, little empirical evidence is available indicating the length of time required to realize such benefits. Therefore, a survey was developed and administered to repetitive manufacturers to examine the relationship between the length of time partnering arrangements have been established and the degree of success in implementing specific purchasing strategies and achieving desired outcomes. Significant relationships were found between the duration of these arrangements and success in the two areas. It was found that partnership-related rewards increase over time.
  • The Organization of a Military Procurement Function, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Winter 1969), p. 68.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Purchasing Audit: A Guide for Management, Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 1979), p. 8.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Purchasing Job in Different Types of Businesses, Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter 1985), p. 17.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Rewards From Being a Disloyal Buyer, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1974), p. 33.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Risks Inherent for a Small Business Taking a Contract as a Prime- or as a Sub-Contractor, Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 1971), p. 43.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Role of Purchasing in Design: A Study in the British Defense Industry, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Summer 1993), p. 26.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Role of Structure in the Performance of Department Store Purchasing Agents, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 7.

    This article is not available online.
  • "The Supply Organizational Structure Dilemma" Members Only Content, Vol. 37, No. 3 (Summer 2001), p. 4.

    This article presents the findings of research into how and why large, multiunit firms make major changes to the organizational structure of the supply function. The research used case-based methodology to investigate 10 large companies that had recently made a major supply structure change. A total of 15 major supply organizational changes were studied at the 10 sites. The research found that these major changes were a result of changes in the overall corporate structure, challenging the conventional view found in standard purchasing texts that supply executives have flexibility in matters of organizational design. The research identified that a common driver for corporate organizational change in each of the sites studied involved an attempt by the company to improve its cost structure. Chief financial officers (CFOs), business unit managers, consultants, and chief purchasing officers (CPOs) were all identified as having involvement in the supply organizational structure change process at some sites. A principal challenge for CPOs is to understand how to provide supply improvement opportunities under any organizational structure.
  • "The Use of Organizational Design Features in Purchasing and Supply Management" Members Only Content, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Summer 2004), p. 4.

    This article presents findings from a study examining organizational design features used by organizations in pursuing their procurement and supply objectives. The research purpose was to gain a better understanding of the organizational design features that firms currently use or may use in the future. The results should encourage organizations to address design issues as they relate to overall supply management effectiveness. Given the dynamics of the current competitive global supply landscape, organizational design concerns are critical to sustained organizational success.
  • The Warranty Bill's Effect on Purchasing, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Summer 1976), p. 10.

    This article is not available online.
  • Time Reciprocity: A Possible Answer to Shortages, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Fall 1974), p. 46.

    This article is not available online.
  • Toward a More Flexible Ordering Policy, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Fall 1985), p. 25.

    This article is not available online.
  • Toward a Role Model of the Organizational Purchasing Process, Vol. 10, No. 2 (Spring 1974), p. 68.

    This article is not available online.
  • Transitory Purchasing Opportunities: A Model and Heuristic Strategy, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1975), p. 18.

    This article is not available online.
  • Use of Hedging in Purchasing, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Spring 1972), p. 47.

    This article is not available online.
  • User Participation and Influence in Industrial Buying, Vol. 21, No. 2 (Summer 1985), p. 7.

    This article is not available online.
  • Values, Value Systems, and Behavior of Purchasing Managers, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 15.

    This article is not available online.
  • Voluntary Collaboration vs. 'Disloyalty' to Suppliers, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Winter 1976), p. 3.

    This article is not available online.