Journal of Supply Chain Management

Article Index - Results


A valuable reference tool, the Article Index is a comprehensive list of articles that have appeared in the Journal of Supply Chain Management (formerly International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management, Journal of Purchasing & Materials Management and Journal of Purchasing). Articles are organized by subject for easy locating and study.

Journal Article Index
Term selected: Pricing Issues

  • A Model of Relational Governance in Reverse Auctions, Vol. 43, No. 1 (Winter 2007), p. 4.

    Despite the popularity of electronic reverse auctions, limited empirical research on their use and key outcomes such as supplier cooperation, purchase price reductions and time savings has been conducted. The current research examines the role that the relative strategic importance of the existing buyer-supplier relationship plays in reverse auction usage, including the type of governance structure established and the three previously mentioned outcomes. Results indicated that existing buyer/supplier relationships characterized as strategic opted for relational forms of governance in reverse auctions. When using transactional governance, this research provides empirical support for reports that reverse auctions result in reduced purchase prices and increased purchaser productivity. Managerial implications are offered, along with directions for future research.
  • An Alternative Criterion for the Quantity Discount Decision, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 1988), p. 31.

    This article is not available online.
  • Coping with International Freight Rate Volatility, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Fall 1987), p. 29.

    This article is not available online.
  • Estimating the Effects of Inflation on Prices: A Practical Approach, Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 1985), p. 9.

    This article is not available online.
  • Evaluating Alternative Quantity Discounts, Vol. 13, No. 2 (Summer 1977), p. 18.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Monitoring Price Increases with Economic Data: A Practical Approach" Members Only Content, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Fall 1997), p. 35.

    Using the Producer's Price Index and the Census of Manufacturers, buyers can track material price movements and changing patterns in labor rates within selected industries. The ability to measure the increase in material and labor costs present in the price structure should make it easier to protect against the price increase. It should also make it more difficult for the suppliers to "pass along" increases in prices that do not add value to the product. In addition, using the material to labor ratio from the Census of Manufacturers, the buyer can monitor trends toward material intensity in the industry. Should this occur, it becomes more difficult to blame price increases on labor, if it is becoming a smaller fraction of price. The PPI can also be used to verify long-term price increases in the industry as well as key component increases.
  • "Multi-Attribute Reverse Auctions in B2B Exchanges: A Framework for Design and Implementation" Members Only Content, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Winter 2004), p. 52.

    Interest in electronic reverse auctions has escalated in importance in both academic and practitioner circles. These auctions are envisioned as a new and more effective method for B2B transactions. While there are numerous applications of traditional price-based reverse auctions, the incorporation of multiple supplier attributes into the auction process has been limited in spite of their argued importance in the literature. The current research develops a framework for designing and implementing multi-attribute reverse auctions in B2B exchanges. More specifically, the article addresses responsibilities and relationships among various players in the auction that include e-broker, buyer and supplier from a client-server perspective, various auction formats and their relative advantages and disadvantages, winner determination methods, and security issues. In summary, a sequence of steps is provided for companies interested in designing and implementing a multi-attribute reverse auction.
  • Negotiating Quantity Discounts Using A 'Learning Curve Style' Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 1988), p. 33.

    This article is not available online.
  • Price Adjustment Clauses Based on Cost Indices, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 1987), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Price Analysis for Negotiation, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 1988), p. 8.

    This article is not available online.
  • Price-Performance Evaluation: A Conceptual Approach, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer 1982), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Efficiency and Pricing Policy, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Spring 1969), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing in a World of Identical Prices, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 1966), p. 79.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing's Use of Flexible Price Contracts, Vol. 14, No. 3 (Fall 1978), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Target Pricing - A Challenge for Purchasing" Members Only Content, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Summer 1995), p. 13.

    One of the most controversial aspects of purchasing operations is proving cost reductions and cost savings. Target pricing and its adjunct, target costing, solve this problem. Coming from Japan where the concept is used extensively, these tools allow the buyer to set the price of materials-and using ESI and value engineering, the target price reduces the cost of materials in the product. In addition, other areas of waste are identified and eliminated.
  • The Buyer's Influence on Pricing Decisions, Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1979), p. 8.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Impact of Electronic Reverse Auctions on Supplier Performance: The Mediating Role of Relationship Variables, Vol. 43, No. 1 (Winter 2007), p. 16.

    The use of electronic reverse auctions (ERAs) by buying organizations has increased dramatically over the past five years. Both anecdotal and empirical evidence have shown that ERAs can lower purchase prices. However, researchers are only just beginning to investigate how ERAs impact perceptions of opportunism as compared to sealed bids and traditional negotiations. Further, researchers have yet to examine how perceptions of opportunism surrounding ERAs might in turn affect such outcome variables as trust, commitment, conflict, and ultimately nonprice attributes of supplier performance. The authors address this gap in the research by developing a theoretically grounded model of the interrelationships among these five variables, and empirically testing the model through a survey of buying organizations that rely heavily on ERAs to select and source from suppliers. The authors' findings suggest that increased levels of opportunism harm supplier nonprice performance, through both their more obvious impact on dysfunctional conflict and their more latent effects on relationship trust and commitment.
  • Transitory Purchasing Opportunities: A Model and Heuristic Strategy, Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1975), p. 18.

    This article is not available online.
  • Use of Price Indexes in MRO Buying, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 1981), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.