Journal of Supply Chain Management

Article Index - Results


A valuable reference tool, the Article Index is a comprehensive list of articles that have appeared in the Journal of Supply Chain Management (formerly International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management, Journal of Purchasing & Materials Management and Journal of Purchasing). Articles are organized by subject for easy locating and study.

Journal Article Index
Term selected: Human Resource Issues

  • "Activity-Specific Role Stress in Purchasing" Members Only Content, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Winter 1999), p. 10. Vol. 35, No. 2 (Spring 1999), p. 10. Vol. 35, No. 3 (Summer 1999), p. 10. Vol. 35, No. 4 (Fall 1999), p. 10. Vol. 36, No. 1 (Winter 2000), p. 10. Vol. 36, No. 2 (Spring 2000), p. 10. Vol. 36, No. 3 (Summer 2000), p. 10. Vol. 36, No. 4 (Fall 2000), p. 10. Vol. 37, No. 1 (Winter 2001), p. 10. Vol. 37, No. 2 (Spring 2001), p. 10. Vol. 37, No. 3 (Summer 2001), p. 10. Vol. 37, No. 4 (Fall 2001), p. 10. Vol. 38, No. 1 (Winter 2002), p. 10. Vol. 38, No. 2 (Spring 2002), p. 10. Vol. 38, No. 3 (Summer 2002), p. 10. Vol. 38, No. 4 (Fall 2002), p. 10. Vol. 39, No. 1 (Winter 2003), p. 10. Vol. 39, No. 2 (Spring 2003), p. 10. Vol. 39, No. 3 (Summer 2003), p. 10. Vol. 39, No. 4 (Fall 2003), p. 10. Vol. 40, No. 1 (Winter 2004), p. 10. Vol. 40, No. 2 (Spring 2004), p. 10. Vol. 40, No. 3 (Summer 2004), p. 10. Vol. 40, No. 4 (Fall 2004), p. 10. Vol. 41, No. 1 (Winter 2005), p. 10. Vol. 41, No. 2 (Spring 2005), p. 10. Vol. 41, No. 3 (Summer 2005), p. 10. Vol. 41, No. 4 (Fall 2005), p. 10. Vol. 28, No. 1 (Winter 1992), p. 10. Vol. 28, No. 2 (Spring 1992), p. 10. Vol. 28, No. 3 (Summer 1992), p. 10. Vol. 28, No. 4 (Fall 1992), p. 10. Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 1965), p. 10. Vol. 1, No. 2 (Summer 1965), p. 10. Vol. 1, No. 3 (Fall 1965), p. 10. Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 1966), p. 10. Vol. 2, No. 2 (Spring 1966), p. 10. Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1966), p. 10. Vol. 2, No. 4 (Fall 1966), p. 10. Vol. 3, No. 1 (Winter 1967), p. 10. Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1967), p. 10. Vol. 3, No. 3 (Summer 1967), p. 10. Vol. 3, No. 4 (Fall 1967), p. 10. Vol. 4, No. 1 (Winter 1968), p. 10. Vol. 4, No. 2 (Spring 1968), p. 10. Vol. 4, No. 3 (Summer 1968), p. 10. Vol. 4, No. 4 (Fall 1968), p. 10. Vol. 5, No. 1 (Winter 1969), p. 10. Vol. 5, No. 2 (Spring 1969), p. 10. Vol. 5, No. 3 (Summer 1969), p. 10. Vol. 5, No. 4 (Fall 1969), p. 10. Vol. 6, No. 1 (Winter 1970), p. 10. Vol. 6, No. 2 (Spring 1970), p. 10. Vol. 6, No. 3 (Summer 1970), p. 10. Vol. 6, No. 4 (Fall 1970), p. 10. Vol. 7, No. 1 (Winter 1971), p. 10. Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 1971), p. 10. Vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 1971), p. 10. Vol. 7, No. 4 (Fall 1971), p. 10. Vol. 8, No. 1 (Winter 1972), p. 10. Vol. 8, No. 2 (Spring 1972), p. 10. Vol. 8, No. 3 (Summer 1972), p. 10. Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 10. Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 10. Vol. 9, No. 2 (Spring 1973), p. 10. Vol. 9, No. 3 (Summer 1973), p. 10. Vol. 9, No. 4 (Fall 1973), p. 10. Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1974), p. 10. Vol. 10, No. 2 (Spring 1974), p. 10. Vol. 10, No. 3 (Summer 1974), p. 10. Vol. 10, No. 4 (Fall 1974), p. 10. Vol. 11, No. 4 (Winter 1975), p. 10. Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1975), p. 10. Vol. 11, No. 2 (Summer 1975), p. 10. Vol. 11, No. 3 (Fall 1975), p. 10. Vol. 12, No. 4 (Winter 1976), p. 10. Vol. 12, No. 1 (Spring 1976), p. 10. Vol. 12, No. 2 (Summer 1976), p. 10. Vol. 12, No. 3 (Fall 1976), p. 10. Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter 1977), p. 10. Vol. 13, No. 1 (Spring 1977), p. 10. Vol. 13, No. 2 (Summer 1977), p. 10. Vol. 13, No. 3 (Fall 1977), p. 10. Vol. 14, No. 1 (Spring 1978), p. 10. Vol. 14, No. 2 (Summer 1978), p. 10. Vol. 14, No. 3 (Fall 1978), p. 10. Vol. 14, No. 4 (Winter 1978), p. 10. Vol. 15, No. 1 (Spring 1979), p. 10. Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1979), p. 10. Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 1979), p. 10. Vol. 15, No. 4 (Winter 1979), p. 10. Vol. 16, No. 4 (Winter 1980), p. 10. Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 1980), p. 10. Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1980), p. 10. Vol. 16, No. 3 (Fall 1980), p. 10. Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter 1981), p. 10. Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 1981), p. 10. Vol. 17, No. 2 (Summer 1981), p. 10. Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 1981), p. 10. Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 1982), p. 10. Vol. 18, No. 1 (Spring 1982), p. 10. Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer 1982), p. 10. Vol. 18, No. 3 (Fall 1982), p. 10. Vol. 19, No. 4 (Winter 1983), p. 10. Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring 1983), p. 10. Vol. 19, No. 2 (Summer 1983), p. 10. Vol. 19, No. 3 (Fall 1983), p. 10. Vol. 20, No. 4 (Winter 1984), p. 10. Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring 1984), p. 10. Vol. 20, No. 2 (Summer 1984), p. 10. Vol. 20, No. 3 (Fall 1984), p. 10. Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter 1985), p. 10. Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 1985), p. 10. Vol. 21, No. 2 (Summer 1985), p. 10. Vol. 21, No. 3 (Fall 1985), p. 10. Vol. 22, No. 4 (Winter 1986), p. 10. Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 10. Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 1986), p. 10. Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1986), p. 10. Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter 1987), p. 10. Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 1987), p. 10. Vol. 23, No. 2 (Summer 1987), p. 10. Vol. 23, No. 3 (Fall 1987), p. 10. Vol. 24, No. 4 (Winter 1988), p. 10. Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 1988), p. 10. Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 1988), p. 10. Vol. 24, No. 3 (Fall 1988), p. 10. Vol. 25, No. 4 (Winter 1989), p. 10. Vol. 25, No. 1 (Spring 1989), p. 10. Vol. 25, No. 2 (Summer 1989), p. 10. Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 1989), p. 10. Vol. 26, No. 1 (Winter 1990), p. 10. Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring 1990), p. 10. Vol. 26, No. 3 (Summer 1990), p. 10. Vol. 26, No. 4 (Fall 1990), p. 10. Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter 1991), p. 10. Vol. 27, No. 2 (Spring 1991), p. 10. Vol. 27, No. 3 (Summer 1991), p. 10. Vol. 27, No. 4 (Fall 1991), p. 10. Vol. 42, No. 1 (Winter 2006), p. 10. Vol. 42, No. 2 (Spring 2006), p. 10. Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer 2006), p. 10. Vol. 42, No. 4 (Fall 2006), p. 10. Vol. 43, No. 1 (Winter 2007), p. 10. Vol. 43, No. 2 (Spring 2007), p. 10. Vol. 43, No. 3 (Summer 2007), p. 10. Vol. 43, No. 4 (Fall 2007), p. 10. Vol. 44, No. 1 (Winter 2008), p. 10. Vol. 44, No. 2 (Spring 2008), p. 10. Vol. 44, No. 3 (Summer 2008), p. 10. Vol. 44, No. 4 (Fall 2008), p. 10. Vol. 45, No. 1 (Winter 2009), p. 10. Vol. 45, No. 2 (Spring 2009), p. 10. Vol. 45, No. 3 (Summer 2009), p. 10. Vol. 45, No. 4 (Fall 2009), p. 10. Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2010), p. 10. Vol. 46, No. 2 (Spring 2010), p. 10. Vol. 46, No. 3 (Summer 2010), p. 10. Vol. 46, No. 4 (Fall 2010), p. 10. Vol. 47, No. 1 (Winter 2011), p. 10. Vol. 47, No. 2 (Spring 2011), p. 10. Vol. 47, No. 3 (Summer 2011), p. 10. Vol. 47, No. 4 (Fall 2011), p. 10. Vol. 48, No. 1 (Winter 2012), p. 10. Vol. 48, No. 2 (Spring 2012), p. 10. Vol. 48, No. 3 (Summer 2012), p. 10. Vol. 48, No. 4 (Fall 2012), p. 10. Vol. 49, No. 1 (Winter 2013), p. 10. Vol. 49, No. 2 (Spring 2013), p. 10. Vol. 49, No. 3 (Summer 2013), p. 10. Vol. 49, No. 4 (Fall 2013), p. 10. Vol. 50, No. 1 (Winter 2014), p. 10. Vol. 50, No. 2 (Spring 2014), p. 10.

    An important managerial function is to determine the sources and effects of stress on employee performance and to be able to take remedial actions. Past research in purchasing has viewed role stress from a global perspective. However, this does not account for potentially different levels of stress associated with the performance of individual purchasing job activities. In this article, the authors identify the primary activities of the purchasing manager and investigate the level of role ambiguity and role conflict associated with each of them. The results suggest that there are five distinct stress groupings of activities: (1) supplier relations and sourcing, (2) core buying activities, (3) source-to-scrap analysis, (4) inside-outside decisions, and (5) tooling activities. Similar results were found for gender and purchasing responsibility subgroups. The managerial implications of these findings for recruitment, training, and stress management are discussed.
  • An Analysis of the Purchasing Manager's Position in Private, Public, and Nonprofit Settings, Vol. 27, No. 4 (Fall 1991), p. 16.

    This article is not available online.
  • "An Empirical Study of the Relationships among Purchasing Skills and Strategic Purchasing, Financial Performance, and Supplier Responsiveness" Members Only Content, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Summer 2000), p. 40.

    Three hypotheses are tested to determine if purchasing skills are related to strategic purchasing, a firm's financial performance, and supplier responsiveness. To test the hypotheses, a survey was administered to a sample of purchasing vice presidents, directors, and managers. A holdout sample was used for exploratory data analysis to test for type (manufacturing compared to non-manufacturing firms) and size (large compared to small firms). A regression analysis of the remaining sample of 85 surveys indicated that purchasing skills were related to strategic purchasing, a firm's financial performance, and supplier responsiveness. Both research and managerial implications are discussed.
  • Are Purchasing Managers Already Obsolete?, Vol. 6, No. 1 (Winter 1970), p. 52.

    This article is not available online.
  • Are Purchasing Supervisors Different?, Vol. 20, No. 3 (Fall 1984), p. 27.

    This article is not available online.
  • Determining Performance Appraisal Criteria For Buyers, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 1988), p. 18.

    This article is not available online.
  • Developing a Procurement Training Program, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Summer 1989), p. 26.

    This article is not available online.
  • Effect of Pay Differential on Job Satisfaction: A Study of the Gender Gap, Vol. 26, No. 3 (Summer 1990), p. 25.

    This article is not available online.
  • Effective and Ineffective Actions of Purchasing Managers, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 1971), p. 11.

    This article is not available online.
  • Effective Buyers: Are They Cunning or Cooperative?, Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter 1987), p. 26.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Factors That Influence Chief Purchasing Officer Compensation" Members Only Content, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Summer 2002), p. 30.

    While several previous surveys have examined the salaries of purchasing professionals, none have addressed the specific issues related to chief purchasing officer (CPO) compensation. This article presents the results of a CAPS Research survey investigating job-related and personal characteristics that influence Fortune 500 chief purchasing officer compensation. Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios to analyze the survey data. Empirical results indicate that the following are the main drivers of CPO compensation: (1) industry, (2) size of organization as measured by annual sales, (3) spend as a percent of sales, (4) total number of employees reporting, (5) levels of management between the CPO and CEO, (6) years of business-related, non-purchasing experience, (7) CPO age, and (8) professional certifications. Implications of the research findings are discussed throughout the article.
  • "Gender Issues in Buyer-Seller Relationships: Does Gender Matter in Purchasing?" Members Only Content, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Summer 2004), p. 40.

    While differences between male and female salespeople are well documented in the literature, evidence is less clear whether these differences matter to the buyer or whether buyers of different gender make decisions differently. The article reports results of a survey of male and female purchasers on the behaviors, trust, credibility and customer orientation of a salesperson. Almost no differences were found on any of the variables for male or female buyers. This calls into question past research that has found differences, and this paper argues that previous findings, while statistically significant, are probably not managerially significant.
  • How the Purchasing Manager Can Improve Employee Performance, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Spring 1973), p. 25.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Human Resource Management within Purchasing Management: Its Relationship to Total Quality Management Success" Members Only Content, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Spring 2000), p. 52.

    The extent to which human resource management (HRM) within purchasing management affects total quality management (TQM) was empirically tested.Five primary results emerged. First, organizations with more successful TQM programs were more likely to stress formal performance evaluations of purchasing employees. Second, purchasing employees at successful TQM firms were more involved in key decisionmaking processes that impact their jobs than their counterparts in less successful TQM firms. Third, purchasing employees in organizations with more successful TQM programs had a greater level of perceived support through job security and less fear of failure when taking a risk. Fourth, purchasing employees in more successful TQM firms had more TQM-related training. Fifth, purchasing employees in more successful TQM organizations were more likely to be rewarded for individual goal attainment than purchasing employees in less successful TQM organizations.
  • Improving Individual Productivity in Purchasing, Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter 1985), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Integrated Supply Management: The Basis for Professional Development, Vol. 28, No. 3 (Summer 1992), p. 12.

    This article is not available online.
  • Labor Relations and the Purchasing Agent, Vol. 2, No. 4 (Fall 1966), p. 41.

    This article is not available online.
  • "Motivating the Purchasing Professional" Members Only Content, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Winter 1999), p. 27. Vol. 35, No. 2 (Spring 1999), p. 27. Vol. 35, No. 3 (Summer 1999), p. 27. Vol. 35, No. 4 (Fall 1999), p. 27. Vol. 36, No. 1 (Winter 2000), p. 27. Vol. 36, No. 2 (Spring 2000), p. 27. Vol. 36, No. 3 (Summer 2000), p. 27. Vol. 36, No. 4 (Fall 2000), p. 27. Vol. 37, No. 1 (Winter 2001), p. 27. Vol. 37, No. 2 (Spring 2001), p. 27. Vol. 37, No. 3 (Summer 2001), p. 27. Vol. 37, No. 4 (Fall 2001), p. 27. Vol. 38, No. 1 (Winter 2002), p. 27. Vol. 38, No. 2 (Spring 2002), p. 27. Vol. 38, No. 3 (Summer 2002), p. 27. Vol. 38, No. 4 (Fall 2002), p. 27. Vol. 39, No. 1 (Winter 2003), p. 27. Vol. 39, No. 2 (Spring 2003), p. 27. Vol. 39, No. 3 (Summer 2003), p. 27. Vol. 39, No. 4 (Fall 2003), p. 27. Vol. 40, No. 1 (Winter 2004), p. 27. Vol. 40, No. 2 (Spring 2004), p. 27. Vol. 40, No. 3 (Summer 2004), p. 27. Vol. 40, No. 4 (Fall 2004), p. 27. Vol. 41, No. 1 (Winter 2005), p. 27. Vol. 41, No. 2 (Spring 2005), p. 27. Vol. 41, No. 3 (Summer 2005), p. 27. Vol. 41, No. 4 (Fall 2005), p. 27. Vol. 28, No. 1 (Winter 1992), p. 27. Vol. 28, No. 2 (Spring 1992), p. 27. Vol. 28, No. 3 (Summer 1992), p. 27. Vol. 28, No. 4 (Fall 1992), p. 27. Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 1965), p. 27. Vol. 1, No. 2 (Summer 1965), p. 27. Vol. 1, No. 3 (Fall 1965), p. 27. Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 1966), p. 27. Vol. 2, No. 2 (Spring 1966), p. 27. Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1966), p. 27. Vol. 2, No. 4 (Fall 1966), p. 27. Vol. 3, No. 1 (Winter 1967), p. 27. Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 1967), p. 27. Vol. 3, No. 3 (Summer 1967), p. 27. Vol. 3, No. 4 (Fall 1967), p. 27. Vol. 4, No. 1 (Winter 1968), p. 27. Vol. 4, No. 2 (Spring 1968), p. 27. Vol. 4, No. 3 (Summer 1968), p. 27. Vol. 4, No. 4 (Fall 1968), p. 27. Vol. 5, No. 1 (Winter 1969), p. 27. Vol. 5, No. 2 (Spring 1969), p. 27. Vol. 5, No. 3 (Summer 1969), p. 27. Vol. 5, No. 4 (Fall 1969), p. 27. Vol. 6, No. 1 (Winter 1970), p. 27. Vol. 6, No. 2 (Spring 1970), p. 27. Vol. 6, No. 3 (Summer 1970), p. 27. Vol. 6, No. 4 (Fall 1970), p. 27. Vol. 7, No. 1 (Winter 1971), p. 27. Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 1971), p. 27. Vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 1971), p. 27. Vol. 7, No. 4 (Fall 1971), p. 27. Vol. 8, No. 1 (Winter 1972), p. 27. Vol. 8, No. 2 (Spring 1972), p. 27. Vol. 8, No. 3 (Summer 1972), p. 27. Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 1972), p. 27. Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 27. Vol. 9, No. 2 (Spring 1973), p. 27. Vol. 9, No. 3 (Summer 1973), p. 27. Vol. 9, No. 4 (Fall 1973), p. 27. Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1974), p. 27. Vol. 10, No. 2 (Spring 1974), p. 27. Vol. 10, No. 3 (Summer 1974), p. 27. Vol. 10, No. 4 (Fall 1974), p. 27. Vol. 11, No. 4 (Winter 1975), p. 27. Vol. 11, No. 1 (Spring 1975), p. 27. Vol. 11, No. 2 (Summer 1975), p. 27. Vol. 11, No. 3 (Fall 1975), p. 27. Vol. 12, No. 4 (Winter 1976), p. 27. Vol. 12, No. 1 (Spring 1976), p. 27. Vol. 12, No. 2 (Summer 1976), p. 27. Vol. 12, No. 3 (Fall 1976), p. 27. Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter 1977), p. 27. Vol. 13, No. 1 (Spring 1977), p. 27. Vol. 13, No. 2 (Summer 1977), p. 27. Vol. 13, No. 3 (Fall 1977), p. 27. Vol. 14, No. 1 (Spring 1978), p. 27. Vol. 14, No. 2 (Summer 1978), p. 27. Vol. 14, No. 3 (Fall 1978), p. 27. Vol. 14, No. 4 (Winter 1978), p. 27. Vol. 15, No. 1 (Spring 1979), p. 27. Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1979), p. 27. Vol. 15, No. 3 (Fall 1979), p. 27. Vol. 15, No. 4 (Winter 1979), p. 27. Vol. 16, No. 4 (Winter 1980), p. 27. Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 1980), p. 27. Vol. 16, No. 2 (Summer 1980), p. 27. Vol. 16, No. 3 (Fall 1980), p. 27. Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter 1981), p. 27. Vol. 17, No. 1 (Spring 1981), p. 27. Vol. 17, No. 2 (Summer 1981), p. 27. Vol. 17, No. 3 (Fall 1981), p. 27. Vol. 18, No. 4 (Winter 1982), p. 27. Vol. 18, No. 1 (Spring 1982), p. 27. Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer 1982), p. 27. Vol. 18, No. 3 (Fall 1982), p. 27. Vol. 19, No. 4 (Winter 1983), p. 27. Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring 1983), p. 27. Vol. 19, No. 2 (Summer 1983), p. 27. Vol. 19, No. 3 (Fall 1983), p. 27. Vol. 20, No. 4 (Winter 1984), p. 27. Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring 1984), p. 27. Vol. 20, No. 2 (Summer 1984), p. 27. Vol. 20, No. 3 (Fall 1984), p. 27. Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter 1985), p. 27. Vol. 21, No. 1 (Spring 1985), p. 27. Vol. 21, No. 2 (Summer 1985), p. 27. Vol. 21, No. 3 (Fall 1985), p. 27. Vol. 22, No. 4 (Winter 1986), p. 27. Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 27. Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 1986), p. 27. Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1986), p. 27. Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter 1987), p. 27. Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 1987), p. 27. Vol. 23, No. 2 (Summer 1987), p. 27. Vol. 23, No. 3 (Fall 1987), p. 27. Vol. 24, No. 4 (Winter 1988), p. 27. Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 1988), p. 27. Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer 1988), p. 27. Vol. 24, No. 3 (Fall 1988), p. 27. Vol. 25, No. 4 (Winter 1989), p. 27. Vol. 25, No. 1 (Spring 1989), p. 27. Vol. 25, No. 2 (Summer 1989), p. 27. Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 1989), p. 27. Vol. 26, No. 1 (Winter 1990), p. 27. Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring 1990), p. 27. Vol. 26, No. 3 (Summer 1990), p. 27. Vol. 26, No. 4 (Fall 1990), p. 27. Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter 1991), p. 27. Vol. 27, No. 2 (Spring 1991), p. 27. Vol. 27, No. 3 (Summer 1991), p. 27. Vol. 27, No. 4 (Fall 1991), p. 27. Vol. 42, No. 1 (Winter 2006), p. 27. Vol. 42, No. 2 (Spring 2006), p. 27. Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer 2006), p. 27. Vol. 42, No. 4 (Fall 2006), p. 27. Vol. 43, No. 1 (Winter 2007), p. 27. Vol. 43, No. 2 (Spring 2007), p. 27. Vol. 43, No. 3 (Summer 2007), p. 27. Vol. 43, No. 4 (Fall 2007), p. 27. Vol. 44, No. 1 (Winter 2008), p. 27. Vol. 44, No. 2 (Spring 2008), p. 27. Vol. 44, No. 3 (Summer 2008), p. 27. Vol. 44, No. 4 (Fall 2008), p. 27. Vol. 45, No. 1 (Winter 2009), p. 27. Vol. 45, No. 2 (Spring 2009), p. 27. Vol. 45, No. 3 (Summer 2009), p. 27. Vol. 45, No. 4 (Fall 2009), p. 27. Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2010), p. 27. Vol. 46, No. 2 (Spring 2010), p. 27. Vol. 46, No. 3 (Summer 2010), p. 27. Vol. 46, No. 4 (Fall 2010), p. 27. Vol. 47, No. 1 (Winter 2011), p. 27. Vol. 47, No. 2 (Spring 2011), p. 27. Vol. 47, No. 3 (Summer 2011), p. 27. Vol. 47, No. 4 (Fall 2011), p. 27. Vol. 48, No. 1 (Winter 2012), p. 27. Vol. 48, No. 2 (Spring 2012), p. 27. Vol. 48, No. 3 (Summer 2012), p. 27. Vol. 48, No. 4 (Fall 2012), p. 27. Vol. 49, No. 1 (Winter 2013), p. 27. Vol. 49, No. 2 (Spring 2013), p. 27. Vol. 49, No. 3 (Summer 2013), p. 27. Vol. 49, No. 4 (Fall 2013), p. 27. Vol. 50, No. 1 (Winter 2014), p. 27. Vol. 50, No. 2 (Spring 2014), p. 27.

    Recent interest in purchasing as a key strategic function has led to numerous articles that describe various programs or technologies that can be implemented to help a firm achieve a competitive advantage through the sourcing function. What is lacking is work that focuses on the people who will be implementing these action programs. This article deals with motivating the purchasing professional to acquire and use the skills necessary to make the function a strategic asset to the firm. A model for motivating skill acquisition and use through measurement systems, compensation systems, and the interaction of both is developed and then empirically tested.
  • Oral Communication Capabilities of Purchasing Managers: Measurement and Typology, Vol. 42, No. 2 (Spring 2006), p. 17.

    As supply chain management (SCM) becomes increasingly important, the sharing of information and oral communication has also increased in significance. This has resulted in the need for an instrument to measure managers’ oral communication capabilities. The main objectives of this paper are to identify the dimensions of the oral communication capability and to develop an instrument to measure this capability. To achieve these goals, a survey was conducted among German and Spanish buyers and supply managers. The results indicate that the oral communication capability construct has a second-order structure with three dimensions: the ability to pass on information, the ability to persuade and the ability to listen and understand. Based on these results, the Oral Communication Capability Self-test (OCCS) was developed. This study also investigates the typology of purchasing managers based on their oral communication capabilities.
  • Organizational Characteristics of Purchasing Personnel In Public and Private Hierarchies, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Summer 1973), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Perceptual Differences Between Buyers and Engineers, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Spring 1986), p. 2.

    This article is not available online.
  • Personal Factors in the Purchasing/Engineering Interface, Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter 1987), p. 9.

    This article is not available online.
  • Personality and Decision-Making Styles of Purchasing Managers, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Summer 1971), p. 33.

    This article is not available online.
  • Procurement in Large-Scale Oil and Gas Projects, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 1987), p. 14.

    This article is not available online.
  • Psychological Need Profiles of Purchasers, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Winter 1986), p. 23.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Agents Are Obsolete, Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 1971), p. 5.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Executive: General Manager or Specialist?, Vol. 3, No. 3 (Summer 1967), p. 16.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Executive: General Manager or Specialist?, Vol. 25, No. 1 (Spring 1989), p. 22.

    This article is not available online.
  • Purchasing Professionals' Propensity to Leave the Purchasing Field, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Fall 1983), p. 22.

    This article is not available online.
  • Research and Training Needs of Industrial Purchasing Managers, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Winter 1973), p. 70.

    This article is not available online.
  • Role of the Sales Representative in Buying Strategy, Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 1979), p. 20.

    This article is not available online.
  • Rx for the Purchasing Executive and His Health, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1966), p. 27.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Engineer and Purchasing Agent Compared, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Fall 1974), p. 33.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Industrial Buyer — Human But Rational, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Fall 1971), p. 63.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Purchasing Agent's Role as a Risk Manager, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1966), p. 52.

    This article is not available online.
  • The Purchasing Agent's Role in a Bankrupt Corporation, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Fall 1971), p. 38.

    This article is not available online.
  • Training Procurement Personnel in Negotiating Skills, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Winter 1974), p. 12.

    This article is not available online.
  • "World-Class Purchasing Skills: An Empirical Investigation" Members Only Content, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Fall 2000), p. 4.

    Changes in the purchasing function and the environment in which it operates significantly affect the ideal skill set required for a world-class purchasing professional. Although much has been written in the popular press about the skills required of a purchasing/supply management professional, very little academic research has been undertaken to examine this topic. The objectives of this study were to ascertain which skills are the most important to the function and to develop a concise set of factors to describe a comprehensive set of skills required of a world-class purchasing/supply management professional. One hundred thirty-six purchasing professionals rated the importance of 30 purchasing skills. The skills were subsequently analyzed via exploratory factor analysis. Strategy, process management, teaming, decisionmaking, behavioral, negotiation, and quantitative skills were identified as key skill dimensions.