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Article Index - Results

1999 Purchasing Today Article Index
Term selected: Supply Chain Management

A valuable reference tool, the Article Index is a comprehensive list of articles that have appeared in Inside Supply Management® (formerly Purchasing Today® and NAPM Insights®) magazine. Articles are organized by subject for easy locating and study.

  • Building a Customer-Centered Supply Chain Members Only Content
    Julie Murphree, June, Vol. 10, No. 6, p. 34.

    Do you know your final customers - really know them? More importantly, does your supply chain know your final customers and the positive domino effect they can have on the chain? More and more supply chain experts emphasize the final customer when developing and implementing supply chain management processes.

  • Determine Your Clockspeed Members Only Content
    Charles H. Fine, Ph.D., October, Vol. 10, No. 10, p. 6.

    Do you know how to determine your organization's clockspeed as it relates to the supply chain?

  • Logistics: A Custom Link Members Only Content
    Roberta J. Duffy, March, Vol. 10, No. 3, p. 22. (Exam Alert: )

    Playing a full role in the supply chain, logistics, with all its varied components, is becoming more customized and feeling the impacts of technology.

  • Make a Play for Second & Third Members Only Content
    Theodore R. Ramstad, June, Vol. 10, No. 6, p. 12.

    Supplier consolidation allows you to influence second- and third-tier suppliers. The key is planning.

  • Some Assembly Required Members Only Content
    Dave R. Fuegner, C.P.M., June, Vol. 10, No. 6, p. 6.

    Evolve and adapt your skill sets to the changes in the purchasing and supply profession, especially as they relate to the supply chain.

  • The Outcome of Influence Members Only Content
    Henry Noble, Jr., September, Vol. 10, No. 9, p. 12.

    Supply chain management (SCM) is a process approach for managing the flow of requirement information from final customers through the tiers of suppliers. Implementation of SCM requires emphasis on what the end customer wants, when he or she needs the product and/or service, where it's needed, and how it's to be delivered. There is, however, a natural tendency toward competition by the suppliers in the chain, which complicates the implementation of SCM. The net result of this competition is a cloud of secrecy that hampers the ability of purchasing and supply managers to influence the first-tier supplier in the selection of second- and third-tier suppliers. This means purchasing and supply managers will have little influence on the selection of third-tier suppliers by second-tier suppliers and so forth, for the particular products or services requested by the end customer.