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Institute for Supply Management™ — Michigan State University Awards for Excellence in Supply Management
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2012 Institute for Supply Management™ — Michigan State University Awards for Excellence in Supply Management Winners

ISM announced the winners of the Seventh Annual Institute for Supply Management™ — Michigan State University Awards for Excellence in Supply Management during ISM's 97th International Supply Management Conference, May 6-9, 2012. The four award winners will be recognized and share their winning stories in Baltimore, Maryland. You can view the winning organizations' submissions and related articles by clicking on the links below.

Winner: Organization/Structure Category

The American Red Cross

The American Red Cross embarked on a major change project to overhaul the entire procurement process designed around three principles: "Simplicity, Synergy and Savings — S3." This initiative resulted in savings in excess of US$40 million in its first two years of operation and being named an Award winner.

Submission

Supporting Documentation

Article


Winner: Process Category

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cisco Systems created a centralized risk management team (Supply Chain Risk Management — SCRM) to ensure business continuity for its global supply chain in 2008 and 2009. Cisco's Award winning application details how they proactively prepared for one of the worst natural disasters in history and ensured minimal disruption to customer orders to avoid huge potential revenue risk.

Submission and Supporting Documentation

Article


Winner: Technology Category

IBM Corporation

IBM's Integrated Supply Chain has real-time visibility throughout multiple tiers of its supply chain with its Critical Parts Management Tool. The company's award-winning entry described how this tool allows IBM and its business partners to effectively manage supply disruptions.

Submission

Supporting Documentation

Article


Winner: Sustainability Category

T-Mobile USA, Inc.

Several years ago, T-Mobile realized that refurbishing the nearly 130 million cell phones Americans discarded each year would help reduce waste as well as benefit the bottom line. Its three-part plan to cut waste and inefficiency included: 1) new refurbished demand channels; 2) increased repair capacity; and 3) improved supplier management. T-Mobile's initiative was recognized as a winner as this plan increased cash flow by US$110 million and reduced costs by 40 percent thus controlling cell phones from cradle to grave.

Submission and Supporting Documentation

Article